Null Hypothesis:
The total amount of foreign investment from 1980-2010 in each country that revolted is equal to the amount of foreign investment in all the other countries in the Middle East that revolted.
Alternative Hypothesis:
The total amount of foreign investment from 1980-2010 in each country that revolted is notequal to the amount of foreign investment in all the other countries in the Middle East that revolted.

Method of Data Analysis: 2-Sample T-Test
Conditions
It can be assumed that the individual country's import volume of goods and services is independent from all other countries that also experienced mass protests. Each country's measure of foreign investment in that country was compared individually to every other country.
The distribution for average import volume from 1980-2010 is approximatley normal.
degrees of freedom:n-1
number of years assesed=30
df=29

Significance level: t=.50
Significance level in context: I would fail to reject the null hypothesis that the total amount of foreign investment from 1980-2010 in each country that revolted is equal to the amount of foreign investment in all the other countries in the Middle East that revolted if the probability for this situation occuring is %50 or greater.

Conclusion:
importsamongmiddleeastcountries.png
How to interpret this picture:

For example: There is an 98% probability that the amount of foreign investment in Jorda is equal to the amount of foreign investment in Egypt, therefore I would fail to reject the null hypothesis that the average amount of foerign investment over the past 30 years are equal.

For all other associations not shown, the probability that their imports of goods and services from 1980-2010 are equal is less than %50, therefore I would reject the null hypothesis that the average amount of foreign investment over the past 30 years are equal.
.
Most countries who are located in the Middle East and have experienced mass protests have a 50% or greater similarity in the imports of goods and services.

Note: No data was availible for the amount of foreign investment in Iraq, a country that has experienced mass protests against its government.